Good news. The John Howard Society has granted three inmates portions of the Ed Griffin bursary. The money goes to educational institutions, not to the individuals.

  •  One man is working toward a college degree. He has a long sentence for a serious crime, but prison officials, teachers and the chaplain all agree that he’s a changed man.
  •  Education is a big part of his plan for reform, but the prison system doesn’t pay for any classes beyond grade twelve.
  •  The second man wants to take his first university course. He’s almost finished getting his Dogwood diploma (Highest high school diploma)
  •  The third man is working toward a PhD in education. He’s on parole now with another year to go before he’s finished his sentence. Working toward a doctorate in any subject is a challenge in a prison setting or in a parole setting.

I’m very happy that something I did has helped these three men. Where I have failed is in raising money. I sort of know what has to be done, but I haven’t done it. My job is to explain all this to the general public. To explain that education is the proven way out of crime. That the prison system only provides education up to and including grade twelve.

More than that, I have to put this in front of the public. We hear about heart problems, cancer, etc. etc. We’re asked to help children in the third world. But how can I help people see that education is the way out of crime? I have to try harder, to be bolder than I am now.

P.S. For an interesting view of private prisons in the States, http://blog.arrestrecords.com/infographic-privatization-of-the-us-prison-system/.

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Comments
  1. No question, particularly in the youth (16-26) cohort. Not having an education for whatever reason (and there are a number of them) naturally engenders a no-hope, no-future, and anti-social mindset that makes crime, especially petty/auto theft and drug-dealing, very attractive. I’m familiar with the several social-service programs that are supposed to rectify this and impressed by how few are their clients (the programs are full; there are just not enough of them) they have, in comparison with the number of youth who have not been in school since their early teens.

    • Ed Griffin says:

      Right you are, Chris. I know of an educator who set up programs for groups of uneducated people, race track workers, migrants, farm workers, on and on. A real hero, but because of a few mistakes on his part, the school system has written him off.
      Ed
      http://edgriffin.net/

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